Invited Speakers

We are proud to present the following keynote speakers at ECEM 2024:

Susana Chung, USA
Hans Gellersen, UK
Jacqueline Gottlieb, USA
Xingshan Li, China
Alexander Schütz, Germany


Susana Chung, UC Berkley

Keynote Lecture:
Fixational eye movements in the absence of central vision


Personal Information:
Susana Chung is a Professor of Optometry and Vision Science at the University of California, Berkeley. She completed her optometry training at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University, and subsequently received a MSc in Optometry degree from the University of Melbourne and a PhD in Physiological Optics from the University of Houston. She then completed her post-doctoral training at the University of Minnesota. The major goals of Susana’s research center on the understanding of the limiting factors on vision in the presence of eye disorders or diseases, and whether effective paradigms could be developed to improve vision for people with impaired vision. She uses a variety of techniques including psychophysics, computational modeling, retinal imaging, and eye tracking in her research. Her research has been continuously supported by NIH since 2000. Susana has received a number of awards for her contribution to research, including the Atwell Award for Research Excellence in Low Vision, the Borish Outstanding Young Researcher Award, and the Glenn A. Fry Award. Currently, she is on the editorial board of Vision Research, Journal of Vision, Optometry and Vision Science and Frontiers of Neuroscience..

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Hans Gellersen, Lancaster University, UK

Keynote Lecture:
Gaze and Eye Movement as Input for Human-Computer Interaction


Personal Information:
My interest is in HCI, human interface technology, and the design of novel sensing and interaction techniques for anything from smart devices to AR/VR. I am particularly interested in eye movement and recently won an ERC Advanced Grant to investigate new foundations in for gaze and gestural interaction. Over the last ten years, my group has contributed major innovations on gaze in HCI, notably on smooth pursuit interfaces and techniques, gaze-supported manual input, and eye-head interaction. We have recently focussed on interaction in 3D but I maintain long-standing interests in ubiquitous computing, cross-device interaction and interfaces that blend the digital and the virtual.

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Jacqueline Gottlieb, Columbia University, New York

Personal Information:
Jacqueline Gottlieb studies the mechanisms that underlie the brain's higher cognitive functions, including decision making, memory, and attention. Her interest is in how the brain gathers the evidence it needs — and ignores what it doesn’t — during everyday tasks and during special states such as curiosity. Her research could offer insight into disorders that involve deficits of attention, such as attention deficit disorder, depression and drug addiction.

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Xingshan Li, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing

Keynote Lecture:
Canyoureadthis? The critical but overlooked role of word-segmentation during reading


Personal Information:
Xingshan Li is a Professor of Psychology at the Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences. He earned his Ph.D. degree in Psychology from the University of Massachusetts Amherst (2007). His research focuses on Chinese reading and language processing. In recent years, he has delved into understanding how Chinese readers deal with the unique features of Chinese text during reading, employing techniques such as eye tracking and computational modeling. Notably, he has proposed innovative perspectives on word segmentation and saccade target selectionby Chinese readers, even in the absence of inter-word spaces. His work culminated in the development of a computational model that simulates eye-movement control and word processing during Chinese reading. Li has an impressive publication record, with approximately 100 journal articles published in esteemed journals such as Psychological Review, Nature Reviews Psychology, JEP: General, and Cognitive Psychology. Additionally, he serves as an Associate Editor for the Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology. His contributions to the field have been recognized through various honors and awards, including the Best Article Award from the Psychonomics Society. His dedication extends to academic service as well, as he actively participates in editorial boards and conferences related to eye movements and cognitive psychology.

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Alexander Schütz, Germany

Personal Information:
Alexander Schütz is a Professor for Experimental Psychology at Marburg University. He studied Psychology at Erlangen University and got interested in visual perception during his undergraduate thesis on the appearance of warning lights in cars. Eye movements came into play when he obtained a PhD in Karl Gegenfurtner’s lab at Gießen University, on the modulation of contrast sensitivity by smooth pursuit eye movements. During his post-doc, he expanded his research interests on saccadic eye movements and visited Dirk Kerzel’s lab in Geneva and Concetta Morrone’s lab in Pisa. He is interested in the perception-action cycle of active vision, i.e., how visual and cognitive signals guide our eyes and how eye movements determine what we see. He received an ERC Starting Grant on the interaction of peripheral and foveal vision across saccadic eye movements and subsequently an ERC Consolidator Grant on the interplay of sensory and inferred signals in different types of perceptual completion. He uses eye tracking, psychophysics, computational modelling and EEG in his research.

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